Highlights of Glasgow

Glasgow Cathedral is through to have been built on the site of
St Mungo's tomb in the 7th century and marks the birthplace
of the city of Glasgow.

Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland, and the third largest in the United Kingdom (after London and Birmingham). It is situated on the River Clyde in the country's West Central Lowlands. Inhabitants of the city are often referred to as Glaswegians,

Glasgow grew from a small rural settlement on the River Clyde to become the largest seaport in Britain. 

Expanding from the medieval bishopric and royal burgh, and the later establishment of the University of Glasgow in the 15th century, it became a major centre of the Scottish Enlightenment in the 18th century. 







Interior of the Cathedral of Glasgow
From the 18th century the city also grew as one of Great Britain's main hubs of transatlantic trade with North America and the West Indies.


With the onset of the Industrial Revolution, the population and economy of Glasgow and the surrounding region expanded rapidly to become one of the world's pre-eminent centres of chemicals, textiles and engineering; most notably in the shipbuilding and marine engineering industry, which produced many innovative and famous vessels. 

Glasgow was the "Second City of the British Empire" for much of the Victorian era and Edwardian period, although many cities argue the title was theirs. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries Glasgow grew in population, reaching a peak of 1,128,473 in 1939. Comprehensive urban renewal projects in the 1960s, resulting in large-scale relocation of people to new towns and peripheral suburbs, followed by successive boundary changes, reduced the population of the City of Glasgow council area to with people living in the Greater Glasgow urban area. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glasgow