Culzean Castle and Robert Burns

Culzean Castle
The castle stands in nearly 600 acres of Ayrshire's finest woodland and coastal walks.  Culzean Country Park boasts no less than five kilometres of magnificent coastline. 


From the sand dunes at the south end of the park to the rugged rocky shoreline, pitted with rock pools, caves and rock arches, the shore and beaches of sand and shingle stretch all the way to Croy Shore, the northern boundary of the park.







Calzean is built on a promontory
Culzean is in the heart of Burns country, a central base for visiting the poet's haunts. There are also other National Trust for Scotland properties within easy driving distance of the Castle. Culzean Castle originally belonged to the Kennedys, an ancient Scottish family descended from Robert the Bruce. There was a stone tower house here in the 16th century, and various Kennedys over the centuries made their mark on the castle with improvements and alterations. 







Magnificent garden
But it wasn’t until the 1770s that it started to become the grand country seat it is today. David Kennedy, 10th Earl of Cassillis and a peer in the House of Lords, commissioned famed Scottish architect Robert Adam to design and build a castle that reflected the family’s status and wealth. It was a no-expense-spared project, but neither Kennedy nor Adam survived to see the castle completed as they both died within months of each other in 1792, shortly before the castle was completed.  
http://www.celticcastles.com/castles/culzean/History.aspx








Childhood home of Robert Burns
Robert Burns (25 January 1759 – 21 July 1796), also known as Rabbie Burns, the Bard of Ayrshire and various other names and epithets, was a Scottish poet and lyricist. He is widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland and is celebrated worldwide. 
He is the best known of the poets who have written in the Scots language, although much of his writing is also in English and a light Scots dialect, accessible to an audience beyond Scotland. He also wrote in standard English, and in these writings his political or civil commentary is often at its bluntest. Celebration of his life and work became almost a national charismatic cult during the 19th and 20th centuries, and his influence has long been strong on Scottish literature.  As well as making original compositions, Burns also collected folk songs from across Scotland, often revising them. His poem (and song) "Auld Lang Syne" is often sung at Hogmanay (the last day of the year), and "Scots Wha Hae" served for a long time as an unofficial national anthem of the country. Other poems and songs of Burns include "A Red, Red Rose", "A Man's a Man for A' That", "To a Louse", "To a Mouse", "The Battle of Sherramuir", "Tam o' Shanter" and "Ae fond kiss". 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Burns